Carol Duncan Novopod
Carol Duncan Friday Music Show 20 August 2010 - Australian Rock

Carol Duncan Friday Music Show 20 August 2010 - Australian Rock

June 29, 2020

Carol Duncan Friday Music Show 20 August 2010 - Australian Rock. Features Zoot, Chain, Stevie Wright, TMG, Sherbet, AC/DC, The Ferrets, Skyhooks and a chat with Bob Spencer. Play it loud. Really loud. 

Neal Smith - original Alice Cooper Band drummer with Mark Tinson and Mac

Neal Smith - original Alice Cooper Band drummer with Mark Tinson and Mac

June 29, 2020

So, about that time Alice Cooper shot Neal Smith in the leg ... allegedly. This one is a loud rock chat. Enjoy! 

Jon English - 3 July 2013

Jon English - 3 July 2013

June 29, 2020

The late Australian star joined me on the show on his return from performing in Sweden. 

Cathedral Park - Resting in Pieces

Cathedral Park - Resting in Pieces

June 29, 2020

How often have you stopped for a rest on one of the low stone retaining walls at Blackbutt Reserve? Chances are, you’re sitting on the remains of the early headstones from Newcastle’s first European burial ground at Christ Church Cathedral. Find out more at lostnewcastle.com.au

The Wallis Album

The Wallis Album

March 27, 2019
After 194 years, a previously unknown album of drawings from 1818, including landscapes and portraits of Aboriginal people from the Newcastle region, returned to Newcastle for a brief exhibition by the State Library of NSW.
HPV - The Radio National Documentary

HPV - The Radio National Documentary

April 2, 2018
Brad Keeling is a man best known as the co-founder of One Tel. But he is also a dear and close friend of ABC broadcaster Carol Duncan. When she discovered Brad had been diagnosed with throat cancer she asked if he'd share his story with her.
Throat cancer is often presumed to be the result of smoking, and while Brad had been a recreational smoker in his twenties, and been exposed to passive smoking, his cancer was the result of the Human Papillomavirus, HPV.
In this feature produced by Carol Duncan we hear from Brad soon after diagnosis, travel with him through surgery and then check in with him as he undergoes treatment to help him recover. First aired June 2013.
HPV - The Researcher

HPV - The Researcher

April 2, 2018
Assoc Prof Karen Canfell is a researcher with the Lowy Cancer Research Centre at the University of NSW. HPV is her area of expertise. What does she want us to know about HPV and the vaccination program? Five years ago, in 2007, we had the implementation of the National HPV Vaccination Program in girls and women in Australia and that's really had incredible effects already. For example we've already seen a drop in the number of young girls infected with HPV, we've also seen a reduction in the numbers of high-grade abnormalities of the cervix which are the precursor to cervical cancer, and we've seen a reduction in anogenital warts which are also caused by different types of HPV which are also included in the vaccine.
CAROL DUNCAN: Karen, your area of expertise is human papillomavirus and I understand there's not just one but 100 or more?
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: That's right, there's a large number of types HPV that have been implicated in cancer but it's really two of those types that are responsible for the vast majority of cancers, HPV 16 & 18 and those types are the ones that are included in the vaccine that is now available to us.
CAROL DUNCAN: I guess this is the point of this series this week is that we now have another cancer which is, in essence, preventable.
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: Yes, I think what we're seeing with HPV is an incredible success story in cancer prevention. This started with the vaccination of girls and women in Australia. Because HPV has a very important role in cervical cancer and, in fact, HPV is responsible for virtually all cervical cancers, the types we just mentioned (types 16 & 18) are responsible for about 70% of those cancers.
Five years ago, in 2007, we had the implementation of the National HPV Vaccination Program in girls and women in Australia and that's really had incredible effects already. For example we've already seen a drop in the number of young girls infected with HPV, we've also seen a reduction in the numbers of high-grade abnormalities of the cervix which are the precursor to cervical cancer, and we've seen a reduction in anogenital warts which are also caused by different types of HPV which are also included in the vaccine.
So in terms of what's happened in females, it's just a remarkable story and we've really seen it play out in Australia before anywhere else in the world because Australia was one of the first countries to adopt the vaccine.
CAROL DUNCAN: And now it takes another step as of this year (2013) with the extension of the cervical cancer vaccine to boys.
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: That's right. Again, Australia is one of the first countries to make this decision.
Last year, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee recommended that young boys are included in the National HPV Vaccination Program and that will roll out from this year. What that means is that it is going to provide incremental benefits to both girls and boys and I think what we have to remember here is that HPV is transmitted between males and females so vaccination of females was already going to have some beneficial effects for males ultimately because it would cut off the circulation of the virus in the population, but by including young boys in the program we have even greater coverage and we also have protection of the gay community, so I think this really does provide and important incremental step to protecting males even further against HPV infection and the cancers that can be caused by it.
CAROL DUNCAN: The cancers that HPV can cause in men are equally as horrific as cervical cancer.
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: That's right, there is a whole range of cancers that HPV can cause in men and also in women in sites other than the cervix.
These include anogenital cancers but also cancers of the head and neck. These are an important set of cancers. I think the complication is that not all of these cancers are caused by HPV but still a significant fraction are and probably that fraction is increasing in the case of head and neck cancers.
CAROL DUNCAN: Dr Jonathan Clark mentioned that, and that so far researchers don't know why the rate is increasing.
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: We can't say definitively but it certainly seems that in Australia and the US that that is happening. A US study has recently shown that cancers of the head and neck maybe now about 70% of them could be attibutable to HPV, so that is a high proportion of those cases.
The other message we need to say here is that vaccination is a really wonderful thing and it's going to have important long-term effects for men and women in Australia and in most countries which have implemented vaccination programs.
But for women in particular, it's really important not to forget about cervical screening because that's what is also protecting older, unvaccinated women against cervical cancer and really the two preventative mechanisms need to work together for the forseeable future.
The main message here is that the vaccination program in females has been incredibly effective. It's about 73% coverage in young girls in Australia, so there still is one in four girls in Australia not being vaccinated so I think for parents of both young boys and young girls at school it's really important to see this as a long-term wonderful gift that you can give to your children in terms of cancer prevention.
CAROL DUNCAN: I have watched six hours of throat cancer surgery, I can assure you you don't want your children to go through that.
ASSOC PROF KAREN CANFELL: Yes I can imagine.
HPV - One month after surgery

HPV - One month after surgery

April 2, 2018
One month after his surgery for throat cancer, Brad talks about the experience and his reflections on having a cancer that is now preventable. HPV. The same virus which causes cervical cancer.
HPV - The Surgery

HPV - The Surgery

April 2, 2018
Brad's throat cancer would require two operations. The first, the removal of a tumour from the base of his tongue, would be performed using the Da Vinci Surgical System (robot) - mostly only used in Australia to date for prostate and gynaecological surgery. The second operation was to remove the lymph glands from one side of his neck.
HPV - The Hospital, The Robot, and the Speech Pathologist

HPV - The Hospital, The Robot, and the Speech Pathologist

April 2, 2018
The Da Vinci surgical system (robot) was reasonably new to Australia in 2013 and was mostly being using for prostate and gynaecological surgery. At Macquarie University Hospital in Sydney, surgeons from other specialities are also using the robot, including in this case for throat cancer. Carol Bryant is the CEO of MUH. Speech pathology is also a crucial part of recovery for patients after this sort of surgery - not just for speech but for swallowing safely. Jenny Cole-Virtue is a Speech Pathologist at MUH.
HPV - “I’ve just got a sore throat!” The role of the GP.

HPV - “I’ve just got a sore throat!” The role of the GP.

April 2, 2018
Do we underestimate the role of our GPs in our healthcare and our understanding of diagnoses and treatment options? Dr Wendy Unwin has been Brad Keeling's GP for 30 years so how does she see her role in his care after his throat cancer diagnosis?
HPV - Diagnosis and treatment options. Dr Jonathan Clark.

HPV - Diagnosis and treatment options. Dr Jonathan Clark.

April 2, 2018
DR JONATHAN CLARK: Brad's been diagnosed with a squamous cell cancer of the tongue base. Squamous cell cancers are the most common type of cancer that we see in the throat and back of the tongue. His cancer has spread from the tongue base to a single lymph node in the upper part of his neck.
The majority of these cancers in 2012 are viral cancers caused by the human papilloma virus and we think in Brad's case that this is one of those types of cancers.
Previously, the majority of cancers in the throat and tongue base were cancers induced by smoking.
The rate of smoking in countries such as Australia is reducing and we're seeing a dramatic change in the prevalence of cancers in this area with the majority now being viral cancers as opposed to cancers due to smoking.
CAROL DUNCAN: The cervical cancer vaccine which is now being provided to young girls is to protect them against HPV.
Yes, it's the same virus and the same type of that virus, type 16, which causes cancers both in the cervix and cancers in the throat - in particular the tonsil region.
We don't know why this type of cancer is increasing, lots of reasons are being speculated, and it's very important to be aware of this change because the prognosis from viral cancers in the throat is much better than cancers due to smoking.
Throat cancer is one of the most common types of cancers in the head and neck region, but having said that head and neck cancers as a group are relatively uncommon in Australia if we compared it to breast cancer or colo-rectal cancer.
In other areas of the world such as India, cancers of the mouth and in particular the cheek and tongue are very common, in fact one of the most common types of cancers. But in Australia, this is a relatively uncommon cancer.
CAROL DUNCAN: How common is the human papilloma virus?
Most people are exposed to HPV, however the majority of people don't develop cancers.
It will be very interesting to see what the impact of the HPV vaccine that's been introduced for girls has on the prevalence of throat cancers in the head and neck population.
At present* boys are not being vaccinated but we expect that with the vaccination of girls the actual rate of HPV in the population will reduce due to what's called 'herd immunity' where if there are less people without the virus in just one gender it will usually reduce the rate of the virus in the other gender. *Note: 2013 sees the introduction of a free, school-based vaccination scheme for boys in Australian schools.
Brad is going to be one of the first Australians having his throat cancer surgically removed with a 'robot', the Da Vinci Surgical System.
Traditionally cancers in the back of the throat were operated on using a very radical approach. We would have to cut the jaw bone and swing the jaw bone out to be able to get to the back of the tongue adequately to remove the cancer. Because of that there's been a shift in treatment away from surgery to using radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy for cancers of the tongue base in particular.
More recently, with the introduction of robotic surgery which has become very popular for prostate cancer, we're able to access the back of the tongue without making any cuts on the lip or the face and get excellent visualisation of the area and be able to remove tumours that we were not previously able to do well without doing a radical operation.
The advantage here of using the robot is to be able to do things in what we would call a 'minimally invasive approach', and in his particular case, in Brad's particular case the advantage of chemo-radiation is it may be possible that he is able to avoid radiotherapy altogether, but more importantly we'll get additional pathological information which helps us to 'risk stratify' his cancer, or determine whether his cancer has a high chance of recurrence, a medium risk of recurrence, or low risk of recurrence.
In those patients who we feel have a low risk of recurrence we would aim to use the least aggressive form of treatment with the least amount of side effects and toxicity.
So, in general, if you can treat someone with one method of treatment - whether it be surgery or radiotherapy or chemotherapy - without combining the two or three together we would expect the side effects to be less.
However there are certainly people who need to have more aggressive treatment and combination treatment.
Our data at the moment suggests that the chances of cure if you combine radiotherapy with chemotherapy are equivalent to the combination of surgery and radiotherapy.
In using the robot to get that pathological information we can also potentially put Brad into a high risk group - hopefully that's not the case but if it was we would then be able to offer him triple-modality therapy which would involve surgery followed by radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with the radiotherapy.
So, at the moment if he was to have radiotherapy it would be a fairly 'cookie-cutter' approach to that, that he would receive as a standard treatment receive radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy.
What we'd like to do in Brad's case is to individualise his treatment and risk-stratify the most appropriate treatment approach.
We still have a long way to go to optimise personal medicine, and HPV has been a very important bio-marker because of its better prognosis.
We still haven't really determined in an individual what the bio-markers are that mean that we can de-intensify their treatment, but we've got a number of standard pathological features that we could use to determine if someone falls into a low, intermediate or high-risk group.
CAROL DUNCAN: How confident do you feel about attempting this surgery using the Da Vinci robot?
We haven't done very many operations this way so there's always a degree of trepidation when you're embarking on something that you haven't done a hundred times but in the cases that we've done so far we've found that the robot gives you excellent visualisation of the area, much better than using traditional approaches.
The arms of the robot enable us to distract and pull tissue in ways that we're not able to do with approaches using trans-oral laser surgery, so that combination of better visualisation and being able to move the arms in free space that we were not able to do previously means that we've got a greater degree of confidence in tackling these types of tumours.
CAROL DUNCAN: What are you expecting with Brad's surgery?
There's two components to the operation. The first part is the removal of the tumour from the back of the tongue.
We're expecting that we'll be removing about one quarter of the base of the tongue area extending on to the tonsil. That operation we'd expect to take about 45 minutes.
We also need to do the second component which is removal of the lymph glands from the left hand side of the neck. We'll do that using the traditional approach of an incision of the neck which we expect to heal very well.
We need to remove the lymph glands from the upper part of the neck and a bit further down but be very careful of a whole host of important structures in that area that are important for movement of his arm and shoulder and for his speech and swallowing.
HPV - One man’s story of an avoidable throat cancer

HPV - One man’s story of an avoidable throat cancer

April 2, 2018
Ep1 - Meet Brad.
For a large part of 2012, my friend Brad complained on and off about a sore throat and earache. On the Friday night before Christmas 2012, I spent six hours in an operating theatre with him as a surgical team removed an HPV-induced cancer from his throat and tongue, and removed the lymph glands in one side of his neck. HPV is responsible for several cancers in men - throat, anus, penis amongst them. HPV vaccination was made part of the Australian vaccination program for girls in 2007, and boys in 2013. Australia now leads the world in the reduction of HPV-induced cancers, including cervical cancer.
Friday Music Show | 30 March 2012 Jim Keays

Friday Music Show | 30 March 2012 Jim Keays

January 14, 2018
Jim Keays - The Masters Apprentices 
Friday Music Show | 5 September 2014 James Reyne

Friday Music Show | 5 September 2014 James Reyne

January 14, 2018
James Reyne feature program

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